The Pedal Forward Blog

14 April 2016

Sustainable housing proves attractive for off-gridders

As consumers become increasingly aware of their environmental impact, many are taking the necessary steps to live a more sustainable lifestyle. This recent trend has produced an extremely large market and has caused a large demand for sustainable housing options.

While tiny homes have been around for decades, the tiny house movement has been increasing in popularity over the past few years. Tiny house communities are popping up all over the United States, giving eco-friendly residents a place to live with fellow-minded tiny homeowners. Portland currently has several tiny home communities, both for short and long-term visits. The reasons behind tiny home ownership may vary. Some use them for travel; some to save money; some due to the environmentally friendly approach many tiny-home designers use.

source: OffGidHub.com

source: OffGidHub.com

“Our concern was that the way we were living was becoming too much… too much money, too much space and too much of an impact on the environment. We want to be free of our financial restrictions and free of the negative effects our “normal” life was causing. We decided to live in a smaller home that runs primarily off of propane and solar panels. Our ultimate goal is to be fully sustainable off of the land to decrease our carbon footprint,” says tiny-homeowner, Jessica Hodge.

This tiny house movement is a big step towards many American’s dream of living “off the grid.” Earthship Biotecture takes this dream and makes it a genuine reality. Earthships are self-sustainable homes made of natural and recycled materials. These homes are essentially ready for any “off-gridders,” allowing users to live of the land through means of solar energy and rainwater collection. Every design aspect of these homes focuses on living independently from public utilities and fossil fuels.

source: Earthship.com

source: Earthship.com

Based out of New Mexico, founder Michael Reynolds defines Earthship by six principles: thermal/solar heating and cooling, solar and wind electricity, contained sewage treatment, built with natural and recycled materials, water harvesting, and food production. These homes provide everything a human needs to live independently of others, all at prices comparable to average U.S. city homes. Whether you get one to be more environmentally friendly or survive post-apocalypse is up to you.

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